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I’ll Be Your Bride If You Can Beat Me!
(比武招亲)

21 August 2006
 

There are legendary stories of ancient heroines selecting their hubbies through kung fu contests. But unlike what had happened with the story of Robin Hood in which the men fought each other, in the Chinese version, the men have to fight against the bride-to-be.

A kung fu hubby selecting story told by a famous Beijing Opera:
Love Through the Iron Bow (铁弓缘 )

Now the heroines have returned. On the Chinese valentine’s Day (July 31), two young women from an all-girl lion dance troop publicly challenged kung fu bachelors all over the China to a fight, and promised to marry the ones who can beat them. More than a hundred men responded immediately, and among them five "top kung fu masters" formally declared their intention to enter the contest. The things started getting hot, and everyone craned his or her neck waiting for this grand reality show to play out. Then, like what had happened in the case of Cowherd Boy and Weaver Girl, a matckbreaker appeared. The daddy of one girl was so upset with the open auction of his daughter’s marriage, and repeatedly ordered her to return home. She eventually gave up and withdrew the deal. Now the contest is put on hold, so are the romantic dreams of the one hundred plus men.

Internet Matchmaker

According to the figures recently disclosed by China’s Internet info centre, by the end of June, the number of total Internet users in China has reached 123 million, a 19.4 percent increase from last year.

Since 1998 the Internet has gradually become a major method of communication and socialising for a large proportion of Chinese. Study shows that 80% people give the Internet matchmaker a positive nod, with thirty percent say they are considering to use the service.

Chinese Cities Are Under Siege by Rubbish

Environmental experts in China claim that more than 400 Chinese cities with 562 million inhabitants are under siege by rubbish. Currently China has 668 cities, which means 2 thirds are surrounded by dumping ground.

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Less Healthy New Generation in China

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